Beginning of Darkness: Mad Max

A man who lost his beloved family now loses his beloved car. He wins a dog and a friend and a friend — or rather a worshipper — so there’s still hope in this grimdark wasteland. More importantly, there is a chance that a prophet will make him a hero, not a broken degenerate seeking escape from the reality.

20161228171113_1

Id vs Superego

After spending many years as a quasi-Luddite, mostly playing classic games and indies on my battered laptop, I finally managed to buy a decent rig. Of all the possibilities, I chose to try out a game every review warns me of. It’s dull and flat, they say, mediocre at best, a wasted chance for the game of the decade. Even if it’s true, it doesn’t really matter. Breathtaking desert landscapes, a postapocalyptic, crumbling society, cars and savages, and most importantly, the titular character — for all that, I’m ready to forgive every flaw the game may have.

20161228004103_1

As usual, I think about adding self-appointed challenges, but after two hours of play it’s hard to figure it out. The only thing that comes to my mind for now:

Cockpit View Only – because immersion is important, and because this is how I played Interstate’76.

And now let’s find out if those critics were right.

Daily Gamer: Look Me in the Eyes

From the Day One, this blog was supposed to be a personal sketchbook to capture my disorderly thoughts about games I was playing, so I didn’t care much about having a profile picture, but since I’ve started to comment other blogs, I think that it’s necessary to finally get one. Because sharing your precious commentary without showing your face would be just rude.

apocalypse-disk-2-of-3cr-hlm_001

Flight Officer Squarehead reporting for duty.

Who would think it would be so easy to find a proper photo? The first game that came to my mind was Apocalypse — a long forgotten helicopter shooter released in 1994. The screenshot above comes from the game’s loading screen and shows our hero, an unnamed pilot on a search-and-rescuse mission in the dark jungles of Majipoor. The sterotypical face of an ├╝ber-masculine action movie hero, its old-school pixelation and the chiaroscuro effect fit my gaming taste perfectly.

What I didn’t expect was that now I feel a strong urge to replay Apocalypse on WinUAE. Well, I was planning to return to it anyway, so let’s add it to my special list of classics I’ve never managed to finish and launch the emulator.

Daily Gamer: Get a Job

While I keep writing posts about my (mis)adventures in Sunless Sea, I didn’t even bother to say something about its parent game Fallen London, even though I’m playing it almost every day since two years. It’s time to right the wrongs.

become-a-murderer

There is poetry even in being a butcher.

There are myriad reasons to like Fallen London, so many that I could spend the rest of my life writing about them. This is one of them: as the protagonist imprisoned in the Neath, you can do the most horrible things without feeling too bad about them, all thanks to the irony and melancholy of the narrative — a welcome change after playing dozens of games where choosing the traditionally ‘evil’ path has absolutely no appeal to me (I’m looking at you, Bethesda Games!).

Daily Gamer: Long-Distance Captain

This Sunday, I’m celebrating. You may call me a Seasoned Zeewolf now.

500

To be honest, I’m really surprised with myself. The main reason for creating this blog was an ugly flaw of character: it’s very difficult for me to finish a game. All too often, I abandon a playthrough not just because I’m bored or don’t enjoy it anymore, but rather because I lose my focus. After all, there are always so many new exciting titles on the horizon, and a few classics I’d like to return to. This is not the case with Sunless Sea, however, because it appears that I’ve finally found a game which was made just for me. Everything — lore, graphics, musics, mechanics, dialogue, characters — seems perfectly tailored to my taste.

When I think about it now, maybe I really should sit down for a while, have a moment of introspection, and write down all the reasons why Sunless Sea is my current Number One. Let’s hope that I’ll be able to make a whole post about it.

New Vegas: From Omaha Beach to Mojave Desert

One of the best things about F:NV is the variety of guns to buy and use on the skull of an unlucky Raider — especially with the Gun Runners’ Arsenal DLC. Now it seems that I’ve found a perfect weapon: the BATTLE RIFLE.

20161126150639_1

Also known as the M1 Garand rifle.

There are so many reasons to love it that it’s too hard to name them all, but let’s try to sum it up one sentence: it has a soul. The fact that The Courier holds a weapon designed about 300 years before he was born, a weapon which saw the beaches of Normandy and mountains of Korea, makes me think about a young warrior who suddenly finds a sword which once belonged to a mythical hero of distant past – Roland, Siegfried and Achilles. The historical background somehow reflects in its appearance, because even on my extremely low-end laptop the M1 looks much more real than other weapons found in the game, especially those fancy plasma and laser toys.

Beside all that, the Garand is an old friend. I’ve encountered it in some other games and always enjoyed firing it, mainly because it’s a semi-automatic rifle. Maybe it’s just me, but a weapon which doesn’t have an automatic mode turns a firefight into hunting. Everytime I manage to put an enemy to the ground with a well-placed shot, there’s a moment of elation – something I don’t feel with energy weapons or assault rifles. ‘Happiness is a warm gun’, indeed.

Shards of Glim: Red Flag Rising

‘Another dashing explorer devoured by the Neath!’ – headline in 20 October 1899 edition of the Imperial Courier.

Before leaving the capital of the fallen Empire, The Tenth Captain was a moderately succesful poet of the Sensualist school, driven by an insatiable lust for new experiences. This flaw of character didn’t leave im on the Unterzee and made him take enormous risks in order to reach further and further during his journeys. Alas, it eventually lead to his demise when his crew succumbed to madness after a succesful expedition into the heart of Frostfound.

la-revolucion

The Eleventh Captain has inherited the toxic self-hatred of one of his forefathers and also intends to take revenge on Fallen London. This incarnation, however, is less selfish that previously. As an Anarchist fully dedicated to the Cause, he will attempt to bring the Liberation of Night into completion and put a red banner on the top of the Shuttered Palace. Then, possibly, he will seek refuge far beyond the know waters, knowing too well that the Revolution, like the Greek god, is a harsh parent.

(which means that I’m trying to steal the monkey ship again, this time without ruining it by a missclick.)

Daily Gamer: Hook

Ooh, that’s why I’m easy

Easy like Sunday morning

Sometimes, I’m fed up with all those big fancy games which require me to understand complex mechanics and read whole paragraphs of sublime English prose (I’m looking at you, Failbetter Games!). Sometimes, all I need is simple and calm gameplay to cool down my mind after a day of work. Fortunately for me, it seems that there are more people thinking this way. Two of them, Maciej Targoni and Wojciech Wasiak, created Hook.

20161113194810_1

This is how a proper opening screen should look like.

Basically, it reminds me of the mini-games encountered in large cRPG titles like System Shock or Skyrim. The goal on each level is to make the titular ‘hooks’ disappear. Each of them is connected to a power source┬áby a wire and the player needs to guess the proper order, because two hooks touching each other means failure.

20160722215327_1

The gameplay gradually gets more complicated with each stage having more elements and occassionally adding new mechanics. Of course, you don’t need to have a degree in advanced mathematics or be a cryptologist working for the CIA, but later levels require some patience and careful thinking.The real-life equivalent would be untangling my MP3 player headphones after taking them out of my pocket, although Hook is decidedly less frustrating than that.

20160807194815_1

The current version has 50 levels and I think that everyone gifted with an average I.Q. can finish it in half an hour, but that’s not the point. Like a meal prepared by a master chef or a classical painting, it is meant to be savoured slowly. Who knows, maybe sometime in the future university textbooks will mention Hook as one of early examples of a video game becoming a true work of art?

The game is available on Steam for a very reasonable price.