Beginning of Darkness: Mad Max

A man who lost his beloved family now loses his beloved car. He wins a dog and a friend and a friend — or rather a worshipper — so there’s still hope in this grimdark wasteland. More importantly, there is a chance that a prophet will make him a hero, not a broken degenerate seeking escape from the reality.

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Id vs Superego

After spending many years as a quasi-Luddite, mostly playing classic games and indies on my battered laptop, I finally managed to buy a decent rig. Of all the possibilities, I chose to try out a game every review warns me of. It’s dull and flat, they say, mediocre at best, a wasted chance for the game of the decade. Even if it’s true, it doesn’t really matter. Breathtaking desert landscapes, a postapocalyptic, crumbling society, cars and savages, and most importantly, the titular character — for all that, I’m ready to forgive every flaw the game may have.

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As usual, I think about adding self-appointed challenges, but after two hours of play it’s hard to figure it out. The only thing that comes to my mind for now:

Cockpit View Only – because immersion is important, and because this is how I played Interstate’76.

And now let’s find out if those critics were right.

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Shards of Glim: Red Flag Rising

‘Another dashing explorer devoured by the Neath!’ – headline in 20 October 1899 edition of the Imperial Courier.

Before leaving the capital of the fallen Empire, The Tenth Captain was a moderately succesful poet of the Sensualist school, driven by an insatiable lust for new experiences. This flaw of character didn’t leave im on the Unterzee and made him take enormous risks in order to reach further and further during his journeys. Alas, it eventually lead to his demise when his crew succumbed to madness after a succesful expedition into the heart of Frostfound.

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The Eleventh Captain has inherited the toxic self-hatred of one of his forefathers and also intends to take revenge on Fallen London. This incarnation, however, is less selfish that previously. As an Anarchist fully dedicated to the Cause, he will attempt to bring the Liberation of Night into completion and put a red banner on the top of the Shuttered Palace. Then, possibly, he will seek refuge far beyond the know waters, knowing too well that the Revolution, like the Greek god, is a harsh parent.

(which means that I’m trying to steal the monkey ship again, this time without ruining it by a missclick.)

New Vegas: Meet the Courier

A truism: Fallout is a Computer Role-Playing Game. My favourite part of playing cRPGs is the possibility to invent a personality of my player character which goes beyond the stats, the so-called alignment or karma. Now, let’s try to answer the question…

Who exactly is the Courier?

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Unlike most other protagonists in the Fallout series (with the notable exception of Fallout: Tactics), the Courier is not a newcomer entering the Postapocalyptia from a sheltered location like a vault or a remote tribal village. Of course, typically for a Bethesda game, he is mostly a blank-slate character, but this time we at least know his profession.

Since travelling alone through the war-torn Mojave Desert implies a certain approach towards life, I decided to give the Courier an amoral, survivalist or even Social Darwinist mindset. Maybe the word ‘amoral’ isn’t correct here and I should call it ‘an alternative morality’ instead, summed up by the motto The Strong Survive. The Courier should be equally able to perform acts of necessary cruelty or to take a more benevolent approach to other people, all the time avoiding the extremes: being a bloodthirsty psychopath on the one hand and a selfless altruist on the other.

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After all, when you survive your own execution and wake up in a grave, you’re not prone to be sentimental and trusting anymore.

Still, the Courier shouldn’t be entirely selfish and close-minded, but rather think about the bigger picture. After all, if the Mojave Desert becomes a well-governed and stable place, his chances of surviving and making a profit will increase. This should bring him close to the philosophy of the Caesar’s Legion, possibly even to join its ranks and help the tyrant overcome his foes — unless another faction convinces our antihero otherwise.

Making Life Harder

Just like when I was playing Skyrim and F3, I’ll set myself a few restrictions for the immersion’s sake:

Three Meals a Day – maybe it’s not necessary to eat so often even when playing in the Survival mode, but having regular meals creates a somewhat realistic rhythm of the day;

No Heavy Weapons – the Courier is allowed to lift a big gun dropped by the enemy and to use it within a very limited range only;

No Save-scumming – with the exception of companion’s death;

Autosaves Only – and suddenly those boring abandoned shacks in the middle of the desert become very important (I’ll make manual saves occasionally just in case of game-killing bugs).

Of course, I might add more restrictions later.

Beginning Of Darkness: Gunpoint

Promises are to be kept, but the promises a man swore to himself are easily broken.

My Windows desktop has a whole column of shortcuts to previously installed games. Each of them is like a granite rock hanging on my heart and for that reason a few months ago I’ve made a decision to stop trying new titles until I’m finished with that painful burden. Predictably, all I managed to accomplish was to make God laugh again — the proverb about telling Him about one’s plans is a bitter truth about human hybris. First, it was the sudden appearence of Sunless Sea in my life, which has consumed most of my playing time since two months, and then I fell again and purchased Gupoint at a Steam sale.

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Jumping into the muddy waters of corporate crime

How could I resist the temptation? Platform games are generally one of my favourite genres, but the idea of a stealth logical platformer is especially appealing to me. Although it seems to be an invention of the modern retro-gaming movement, I can still recall its possible predecessors in titles like Alcatraz or Black Thorne. The former had innovative mechanics, forcing the player to avoid searchlights by finding hiding spots in a two-dimensional environment, while in the latter hugging the walls was crucial in surviving the fight with mean proto-Orks wearing oversized shotguns.

Another major reason to play Gunpoint was the film noir theme. While I do realise that many of its elements have become a cliché long time ago — cynical protagonists clad in trench coats, poisonous femmes fatales, constant gloom and rain, whisky and cigarettes — I still cannot resists its charm, which is fitting for a man who used to devour cheap Polish editions of Chandler’s novels. Especially when the general theme is accompanied by a soundtrack which matches it perfectly.

When I’m writing these words, my hacker-detective in sour armour has already begun his dubious carreer in the shady P.I. business. After completing a few simple jobs, and even finishing one mission with a perfect score and a very nice golden achievement badge (thanks, Steam!), I feel sure that I can handle the game well, but this time I’m not going to set myself too ambitious goals. I’ll leave that for a second playthrough.

Customer Friendly: Finish all missions with A+ rating

…which will mean that I’ll be riding the moral scale back and forth, because my clientele is a really colourful bunch, some of them wishing to minimise the violence, others demanding a permament removal of all witnesses. Philip Marlowe would be proud of me.