Fallout 3: The Net is Tightening

When I was starting my current ‘evil’ playthrough, I decided for a hopeless fight — not just against the Enclave and supermutants, but against the flawed game engine itself. It is a truism that Bethesda games are usually unstable, to say at least, or rather riddled with bugs like a Russian soldier’s trenchcoat, to put it in a blunt way. To make things even worse, the mods I installed, and it’s just a couple of them, make Fallout 3 even more prone to strange behaviour and sudden crashes. Therefore, to make things even more exciting and unpredictable, I started to avoid regular saving and relied on autosaves only. This makes it impossible to reverse things in case of encountering a crippling, game-crashing bug or glitch. There is an entire ‘philosophy’ behind this kind of approach which I explained in one of the old posts.

Recently, I’ve returned to F3 after a few months of vacation from the Capital Wasteland and its perils. Suddenly, it appears that I’m trapped in the Tenpenny Tower. When I attempt to enter my suite, the screen goes black and remains so without loading the new location, which means that now I’m cut off from my wonderful collection of unique guns and, what’s even worse, from my spare power armour, which I will definitely need to survive the trip north to the Little Lamplight and beyond it, into the supermutant stonghold located in the depths of Vault 87.

Tenpenny Tower
There’s only black void behind that door

The situation is getting worse with every step I take. When I use the nearby lift to go down into the main hall, I’m not even able to return upstairs. All this feels like having a noose on your neck, tightening with every breath, and it’s all too possible that I’ll have to abandon the game, since there are no old savegames to use a life saving throw. What if it’s the so-called karma, or rather metaphysical justice being served, and Hagen, my villain character, has to pay for the sins of his past? On the one hand, it would a damn shame to leave the game unfinished after hundreds of hours spent playing it, on the other hand, though, what a great story would it make! At some point, I stopped roleplaying as a heartless bastard, but before this heel turn many innocents had suffered at the hands of Hagen — a former slaver and bandit, personally responsible for the gigantic mushroom over the serene settlement of Megaton. Is it possible that, even after he abandoned the path of evil, the repent villain will be punished? I’ll know the answer soon.

Advertisements

Fallout 3: Sun and Steel

Pitt Outskirts
Self-defence and Slavery

The Pitt may be the best Fallout 3 add-on released by Bethesda, and certainly it’s my favourite one. The Lone Wanderer meets a stranger posing as a leader of slave resistance in the ruined Pittsburgh, which has been turned into a colossal industrial combine by a certain raider leader.  On the moment he crosses the main gate, our character is immediately knocked down by the guards and eventually wakes up at the literal bottom of the social ladder — as a slave wearing tattered rags who is forced to labour in a steelyard, facing savage mutants, radiation and, let’s not underestimate it, horrible food, the Slop. Thanks to the player’s skill (and sometimes the liberal use of quickloading), he may slowly rise from an indentured worker to an arena fighter, and eventually has the chance to become one of the Evil Overlord’s henchmen. Of course, the resistance among the enslaved population is still active and requires his help in preparing a rebellion, but the line between good and bad, the downtrodden and the oppressors, is becoming blurry…

There are two main reasons to like this mod: the first one will be obvious to everone who looks at a few screenshots or finds a gameplay video on YouTube. To put it in a nutshell, the entire location looks and feels like a part of the Mad Max universe combined with a futuristic version of the Soviet Gulag. Personally, I think that the overall tone matches the postapocalyptic tone of the Fallout series better than any other location or quest in its third installment.

The other reason is that The Pitt forces even the advanced players to start from scratch again. When he was about to enter the compound, my Hagen was a proud owner of an Enclave Power Armour, armed with a blaster literally from the outer space, and boasting 30 levels of experience. At this point, it was very refreshing to have to survive with minimum equipment, searching the gloomy steelyard for metal ingots and repelling mutant attacks again and again. The first major quest may be the most interesting and satysfying in the entire DLC, but I will write more about it another day.

Fallout 3: Sun and Steel

Pitt Outskirts

The Pitt may be the best Fallout 3 add-on released by Bethesda, and certainly it’s my favourite one. The Lone Wanderer meets a stranger posing as a leader of slave resistance in the ruined Pittsburgh, which has been turned into a colossal industrial combine by a certain raider leader.  On the moment he crosses the main gate, our character is immediately knocked down by the guards and eventually wakes up at the literal bottom of the social ladder — as a slave wearing tattered rags who is forced to labour in a steelyard, facing savage mutants, radiation and, let’s not underestimate it, horrible food, the Slop. Thanks to the player’s skill (and sometimes the liberal use of quickloading), he may slowly rise from an indentured worker to an arena fighter, and eventually has the chance to become one of the Evil Overlord’s henchmen. Of course, the resistance among the enslaved population is still active and requires his help in preparing a rebellion, but the line between good and bad, the downtrodden and the oppressors, is becoming blurry…

There are two main reasons to like this mod: the first one will be obvious to everone who looks at a few screenshots or finds a gameplay video on YouTube. To put it in a nutshell, the entire location looks and feels like a part of the Mad Max universe combined with a futuristic version of the Soviet Gulag. Personally, I think that the overall tone matches the postapocalyptic tone of the Fallout series better than any other location or quest in its third installment.

The other reason is that The Pitt forces even the advanced players to start from scratch again. When he was about to enter the compound, my Hagen was a proud owner of an Enclave Power Armour, armed with a blaster literally from the outer space, and boasting 30 levels of experience. At this point, it was very refreshing to have to survive with minimum equipment, searching the gloomy steelyard for metal ingots and repelling mutant attacks again and again. The first major quest may be the most interesting and satysfying in the entire DLC, but I will write more about it another day.