Weekly: Back to the Trenchcoat Future

Connor

A coat, a fedora hat, a gun and… jumping trousers? I have you at Gunpoint!

Admittedly, my previous approach to this game was utterly wrong. While my initial reaction was enthusiastic, I simply got tired of trying to finish each level with the best result possible. Now, I’m back in the noir-cyberpunk business and a more relaxed way to play Gunpoint makes me discover how great it is. Just like mentioned in that post long time ago, all I want is to make my clients happy and get the A+ rating for every mission.

One of my favourite things is the dialogue system, even if it doesn’t reach the level of Fallout 2 writing.

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Maybe it’s not much, but I really enjoy to choose between snarky and cold, professional answers – especially when my choice isn’t just cosmetic and determines the plot. Besides, just passing levels and solving puzzles (which light to turn off first?) is a pleasurable experience. Yeah, I’ve come back and now I’m ready to finish the game.

Meanwhile, it’s The Current Year and I discovered that demo versions still exist.

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Too bad that the demo of Wolfenstein: The New Colossus was a huge disappointment. It’s not even about the ridiculous opening sequence, but even playing the first level feels bad. A shooter which doesn’t give you any pleasure of shooting. Still, everyone and their mum tells me that it’s a great game, so maybe I should give it another chance.

The only positive thing so far is that it made me realise how much I’ve always loved demo versions. Why don’t I write a post explaining why they are a unique experience…

 

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Beginning Of Darkness: Gunpoint

Promises are to be kept, but the promises a man swore to himself are easily broken.

My Windows desktop has a whole column of shortcuts to previously installed games. Each of them is like a granite rock hanging on my heart and for that reason a few months ago I’ve made a decision to stop trying new titles until I’m finished with that painful burden. Predictably, all I managed to accomplish was to make God laugh again — the proverb about telling Him about one’s plans is a bitter truth about human hybris. First, it was the sudden appearence of Sunless Sea in my life, which has consumed most of my playing time since two months, and then I fell again and purchased Gupoint at a Steam sale.

First Post
Jumping into the muddy waters of corporate crime

How could I resist the temptation? Platform games are generally one of my favourite genres, but the idea of a stealth logical platformer is especially appealing to me. Although it seems to be an invention of the modern retro-gaming movement, I can still recall its possible predecessors in titles like Alcatraz or Black Thorne. The former had innovative mechanics, forcing the player to avoid searchlights by finding hiding spots in a two-dimensional environment, while in the latter hugging the walls was crucial in surviving the fight with mean proto-Orks wearing oversized shotguns.

Another major reason to play Gunpoint was the film noir theme. While I do realise that many of its elements have become a cliché long time ago — cynical protagonists clad in trench coats, poisonous femmes fatales, constant gloom and rain, whisky and cigarettes — I still cannot resists its charm, which is fitting for a man who used to devour cheap Polish editions of Chandler’s novels. Especially when the general theme is accompanied by a soundtrack which matches it perfectly.

When I’m writing these words, my hacker-detective in sour armour has already begun his dubious carreer in the shady P.I. business. After completing a few simple jobs, and even finishing one mission with a perfect score and a very nice golden achievement badge (thanks, Steam!), I feel sure that I can handle the game well, but this time I’m not going to set myself too ambitious goals. I’ll leave that for a second playthrough.

Customer Friendly: Finish all missions with A+ rating

…which will mean that I’ll be riding the moral scale back and forth, because my clientele is a really colourful bunch, some of them wishing to minimise the violence, others demanding a permament removal of all witnesses. Philip Marlowe would be proud of me.