Weekly: Springtime for Uncle Ho

My wonderful adventure in the post-nuclear Boston was suddenly interrupted by the sound of UH-1 helicopters blasting Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyries. That’s right, I entered April and the spring surrounded by burning napalm. Fire, walk with me.

 

Battlefield Vietnam
Source: fluxy.net

 

When doing some spring cleaning at my parents’ house during the Easter holidays, I found an unexpected treasure at the bottom of my old wardrobe. Lo and behold! A forgotten copy of Battlefield Vietnam. Since both I and my little brother used to be dedicated fans of the game, without much thinking I asked him if he’d like to revive the good old times and throw a mini-LAN party. His answer was more than enthusiastic.

After two evening sessions, each two or three hours long, I can tell that it’s an absolute classic. Obviously, the visual side looks very outdated 14 years after the game’s release, but the rest is still as great as I remember it. One of my favourite things about BF:V is that it finally fives some screen time to the South Vietnamese army and treats them fairly – something that I wish would happen more often in Western media tackling the subject of Vietnam War.

Now, the most important thing. Since it’s spring now, the temperatures are constantly rising and the concrete jungle I live in will feel like being in Saigon. Therefore, I officially announce that I’m opening the Vietnam War video games season. We’ll see whether I go back to classics like Vietcong or Men of Valor, or maybe try out something new like the strategy game Vietnam’65. In any case, I’ll surely write more about that.

 

TERROR_101_AM_1123_0136-RT-590x393
Source: TV Series Finale

 

I barely watch any TV shows these times, but I’ll definitely make an exception forĀ The TerrorĀ recently released by AMC. I didn’t read the novel by Dan Simmons it’s based on, supposedly a bestseller, but it seems the closest thing we have to a film adaptation of Sunless Sea, a game I spent more than 700 delightful hours with. Sure, the show is not set in an alternative Victorian era where London was kidnapped by pointy-eared eldritch abominations, but it has Royal Navy exploring the northern wastes in search of another passage to the Pacific Ocean. Their adventures involve cold, darkness, cannibalism and a bit of supernatural, so it feels close enough. I deliberately won’t read anything about the historical events which served Mr Simmons as the background for the book’s plot. All I’ll do is to watch a few episodes, compare them with my (very rich) memories from the Neath, and maybe write a few words about it.

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