Weekly: Arstotzka Film Presents

For the past few weeks, I’ve mostly kept babbling about Fallout 4 and how much I’ve enjoyed playing it so far. Now it’s time to change it because a real miracle happened: a film adaptation of a video game which is more than decent.

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Disclaimer: since this is my first attempt to write a film review, you have to know that I’m not even trying to be objective. Not only because I love this game, but also because I’m biased against American film industry and culture in general while having a soft spot for Russian films.

Maybe it’s dangerous to use such big words in the age of post-sincerity, but Papers Please is a masterpiece for me and nothing will ever change my mind. When I learned that a short film based on Lucas Pope‘s game is about to be released, I felt mostly two emotions: awe and trembling. As a dedicated fan of his work, I was more than happy, but as a fan of video games in general, someone who watched Super Mario Bros. and Assassin’s Creed, I was also afraid of a disaster – after all, most films based on video games are forgettable crap. My anxiety dropped a little after further reading when I learned that the incoming short film was being made not by a big Hollywood studio but by a small Russian team lead by the director Nikita Ordynskiy.

Thus, when it was finally released on Steam, I pushed the ‘play’ button with a trembling finger…

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Due to its length, the film’s plot is simple. It starts with The Inspector arriving at work and having a short conversation with the guard Sergiu who asks him for a favor. Then the day starts and he has to process the people trying to cross the border, facing heartbreaking dilemmas, taking difficult decisions and paying the final price for them.

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Acting is convincing enough, and Igor Savochkin seems to have been born to play the main character with his sharp features and deep-set eyes. When he struggles to hide his conflicted emotions, it feels like looking at someone who desperately tries to get out of a very deep trap pit, but also reminds the viewer that The Inspector is as much an oppressor as a victim of Arstotzka‘s system – I’ve crossed a few Eastern European borders in my life and I remember the same stone-cold faces and piercing eyes of border officials checking my passport. Another remarkable role is played by Antonina Kravcova. If you’ve ever rejected Eliza in the original game, you’ll remember her sad eyes and resigned voice for long.

20180323232630_1.jpgAdmittedly, the film treats the source material seriously and only manages to capture its original tone but even incorporates the interface and mechanics, and does it seamlessly. The camera repeatedly zooms on the passports when The Inspector looks for discrepancies, at one point he receives a printed order from the Ministry (I swear, the dreaded printer sound made me jump) and, of course, there’s the ominous red stamp. Of course, there are minor alterations, for example the protagonist has a Makarov pistol instead of a rifle in his safe, but they don’t change the overall impression at all.

The only single criticism I can bring is the film’s duration, obviously. It should be at least one hour longer, with long shots and lots of silence, to match the game’s atmosphere and make the plot look less simplistic. Beside that, this is how an adaptation of a video game should look like and I can certainly recommend it to anyone, even they never played Papers, Please or even if they aren’t interested in video games at all. If you hear that your favorite game is being put on the silver screen, be sure to bomb the screenwriters and the director with links to Ordynskiy‘s film so they can learn how to get the job done.

Glory to the New Arstotzka!

(sorry, I had to finish the post like this)

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5 thoughts on “Weekly: Arstotzka Film Presents”

      1. Since you’ve recently had so much stress in your life, I have to warn you that it’s a bit hard and frustrating at the start, but when you finally learn the ropes, it becomes a relaxing and satysfying experience. Which is a bit weird, since you basically play a slave to a dictatorship who constantly deals with human misery and evil.

        Liked by 1 person

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